The Benefits of Vitamin B Complex, Plus Top Food Sources

Alluded to as vitamin B complex, the eight B vitamins — B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, B7, B9, B12 — assume a critical part in keeping our bodies ... thumbnail 1 summary

Alluded to as vitamin B complex, the eight B vitamins — B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, B7, B9, B12 — assume a critical part in keeping our bodies running like all around oiled machines. These basic supplements help change over our sustenance into fuel, enabling us to stay invigorated for the duration of the day. While huge numbers of the accompanying vitamins work couple, every ha its own particular advantages — from advancing solid skin and hair to forestalling memory misfortune or headaches.

So is it an opportunity to begin accumulating B complex? Not really, says enrolled dietitian, Tanya Zuckerbrot. "Taking a B complex vitamin won't make uplifted readiness or vitality the way caffeine does," says Zuckerbrot, writer of The Miracle Carb Diet: Make Calories and Fat Disappear — with Fiber. The uplifting news? "Odds are the normal individual is now getting a lot of B vitamins from the sustenance they eat." Read on to discover why every B vitamin is so imperative. Furthermore, ensure you're eating the correct nourishment to get a lot of them in your eating routine.


Vitamin B: The 8 B Vitamins Plus Top Food Sources

B1 helps the body make healthy new cells. It’s often called an anti-stress vitamin because of its ability to protect the immune system. When carbo-loading (either to prepare for a big race or just because pizza tastes that good), studies say this vitamin is necessary to help break down those simple carbohydrates.

Get it from Whole grains, peanuts, beans, spinach, kale, blackstrap molasses and wheat germ

B2 (Riboflavin)

This B vitamin works as an antioxidant to help fight free radicals (particles in the body that damage cells). It may also prevent early aging and the development of heart disease. And, riboflavin is important for red blood cell production, which is necessary for transporting oxygen throughout the body. Several studies suggest B2 can help stave off migraines, but more research is needed to be sure. And be careful, while sunlight does the body good, ultraviolet light reduces the riboflavin content in food sources. You should purchase milk, for instance, in opaque containers in order to keep this vitamin from breaking down.

Get it from: Almonds, wild rice, milk, yogurt, eggs, Brussels sprouts, spinach and soybeans

B3 (Niacin)

One of the primary uses for niacin is to boost HDL cholesterol (i.e. the good cholesterol). And the higher a person’s HDL, the less bad cholesterol he or she will have in their blood. Vitamin B3 deficiency is very rare in developed countries, though alcoholism has been shown to lower B3 levels in some individuals. Niacin, used topically and ingested, has also been found to treat acne.

B5 (Pantothenic Acid)

You can find small amounts of vitamin B5 in just about every food group — its name even says so. Pantothenic comes from the Greek word pantothen, meaning “from everywhere.” In addition to breaking down fats and carbs for energy, it’s responsible for the production of sex and stress-related hormones including testosterone. Studies show B5 also promotes healthy skin with the ability to reduce signs of skin aging such as redness and skin spots.

Get it from: Avocados, yogurt, eggs, meat and legumes


B6 (Pyridoxine)

Along with fellow B vitamins 12 and 9, B6 helps regulate levels of the amino acid homocysteine (associated with heart disease). Pyridoxine is a major player in mood and sleep patterns because it helps the body produce serotonin, melatonin and norepinephrine, a stress hormone. Some studies suggest vitamin B6 can reduce inflammation for people with conditions like rheumatoid arthritis.

Get it from Chicken, turkey, tuna, salmon, lentils, sunflower seeds, cheese, brown rice, and carrots

Get it from Yeast, red meat, milk, eggs, beans and green vegetables

B9 (Folate)

You may have heard another name for B9 — folic acid — which is the synthetic form used in supplements and fortified foods like cereal and bread. Studies suggest folate may help keep depression at bay and prevent memory loss. This vitamin is also especially important for women who are pregnant since it supports the growth of the baby and prevents neurological birth defects.

Get it from: Dark leafy greens, asparagus, beets, salmon, root vegetables, milk, bulgur wheat and beans
B12 (Cobalamin)

This B vitamin is a total team player. Cobalamin works with vitamin B9 to produce red blood cells and help iron do its job: create the oxygen-carrying protein, hemoglobin. Because you can only find vitamin B12 animal products, studies show higher rates of non-meat eaters with a deficiency. “But unless you are a strict vegan or vegetarian,” Zuckerbrot says, “it’s not hard to get enough of this vitamin in your diet.” For those who are deficient, it may be necessary to supplement the diet with B12.

Get it from Fish, shellfish, dairy, eggs, beef, and pork

No comments